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Lush forests, mountains in silhouette, and the unusual glow of super-sized moons, melting into industrial landscapes of the Pacific Northwest states. This is the majestic yet weird scenery that inspired Carol and Humberto for the men’s Fall/Winter collection, interpreted in cool, twilight tones in several bold and abstracted landscape scenes.

 

To find out more about what makes this part of the United States so special, KENZINE asked three Pacific Northwest natives to share a travel guide to their region. Jacqui Scoggin of the creative studio Year Round Co. and a prolific cook, introduces the San Juan Islands.

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"The San Juan Islands are one of the gems of the Pacific Northwest. We head up several times a year to vacation and enjoy some much needed relaxation. We stay with a friends family on Lopez Island, but have also done a bike tour where we stayed at each island.  The islands are rated as one of the best bike touring places in the world; if you have the chance and enjoy biking we'd fully recommend it.

 

It's about a two hour drive from Tacoma to the ferry landing, but arrive early (especially in the Summer) because wait times can be long. Each of the four islands the main ferry stops at has its own quirky characteristics, but which ever one you land on you are immediately on "island time". All offer an endless amount of rocky coastline, wooded acres for hiking, agricultural farm land, whale and seal watching, bald eagle sighting, seasonal local food and wine offerings, and all around good vibes.

Lopez Island
We may be a little bias, but Lopez is our favorite island. Drive off the ferry and you'll soon notice every car passing by gives you a wave, it's known as the "Friendly Isle". Only 15 miles long and filled with such natural beauty, it's a place you instantly feel a part of.

 

Activities:


Iceberg Point - Walk out across the wind swept bluffs on the island's southern tip and take in the ocean vistas. Easy hiking trails lead to natural wildlife sightings.

 

Shark Reef Sanctuary - On the west side of the island you'll take a quick walk through the woods before coming to a rocky shoreline perfect for watching seals and sea lions.

 

Watmough Bay - Crystal clear deep blue waters and dramatic wooded cliff sides are what you can expect at Watmough Bay. Perfect spot for spending time on the beach.

 

Spencer Spit - Also a camping spot, Spencer Spit offers sheltered picnic areas and a long spit to walk out on and learn the history of early settlers of the island.

Orcas Island
The horseshoe shaped island is home to the outdoor adventurist and known as the "emerald isle" to locals. Most of the island is rural and hilly, take the scenic Byway driving tour to fully take in all the island has to offer.

 

Activities:


Doe Bay - Home to the Doe Bay Festival, one of the best outdoor music events in the area. Also a resort and retreat for a little relaxation.

 

Moran State Park - Boasting over 5,200 acres and several lakes, you can bike, drive, swim, or hike up the island's highest point to Mt. Constitution for breath-taking views of all the islands, Cascades, and Mt. Baker.

 

Eastsound - At the center of the island and the place for walking between art galleries, historic homes, restaurants, cafes, and visitor attractions.

Friday Harbor
The most populated island in the San Juan's, with historic Friday Harbor at the ferry landing. Browse the many shops, art galleries, antique shops, and restaurants. Perfect stop for anyone traveling on foot as everything is within walking distance and you can take the San Juan Transit shuttle buses for viewing spots around the island.

 

Activities:

Lime Kiln Point State Park - Also known as Whale Watch Park because of the three local orca pods that frequent the area in the summer. The only park in the world that's shore is dedicated to shore-based whale watching.

 

Roche Harbor - You'll find a marina full of yachts, waterside eateries, and local artisans in the small harbor. Be sure to check out the San Juan Islands Sculpture Park for viewing over 125 sculptures.

 

Pelindada Lavender Farm - One of the largest lavender farms in the country, be sure to stop by for the lavender festival in July.

 

The Whale Museum - First Museum in the country devoted to a species living in the wild.  Learn about the endangered population of Orca Whales."

Discover also our KEEP KENZO WEIRD travel guide on Pinterest.

Lush forests, mountains in silhouette, and the unusual glow of super-sized moons, melting into industrial landscapes of the Pacific Northwest states. This is the majestic yet weird scenery that inspired Carol and Humberto for the men’s Fall/Winter collection, interpreted in cool, twilight tones in several bold and abstracted landscape scenes.

To find out more about what makes this part of the United States so special, we asked three Pacific Northwest natives to share a travel guide to their region. Originally from Melbourne, Australia, Georgia Frances King now calls the tree-lined streets of Portland, Oregon her home. She is the editor of Kinfolk and the new unabashed owner of one-too-many flannel shirts. She gives us a tour around Portland.

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“Portland is a city that is so liberal we have five quadrants: Northeast, Southeast, Northwest, Southwest and… plain ole North. Each area has its quirks and deserves to be explored, though half of the fun of visiting this smallish city is spending time in the weird and wonderful natural locales that surround it. Here’s a short list that encompasses some of our favorites. 

SALT & STRAW, 838 Northwest 23rd Avenue, 2035 North East Alberta Street and 3345 Southeast Division Street.

 

Green fennel and maple, Arbequina olive oil, dandelion and spring flowers: These may sound like bruschetta toppings, but they’re some of the flavors available at our most infamous ice-cream store. Be prepared—the lines are long, but if it’s an authentic Portland experience you’re wanting, then queuing for the best food is definitely one of them. 

SWEEDEEDEE, 5202 North Albina Avenue.


It is near-impossible to step foot in this cozy establishment without running into a Kinfolk staff member. Mismatched ceramic mugs line the walls alongside an impressive vinyl collection from Mississippi Records, which is housed next door, and there is always a miniature bouquet of locally picked flowers to keep your table company. Their honey pie (a custardy concoction of the sweet stuff mixed with cream) is legendary to locals, but their whiskey cake, salads and egg sandwich are the insider picks. 

NAVARRE, 10 North East 28th Avenue.

 

Incredible food abounds in Portland, so it’s no surprise that tapas joints are resurging, allowing diners to get their fingers into as many dishes as possible at once. One such place is Navarre, a swanky neighborhood institution with a charmingly simple method of ordering that involves ticking off boxes on a laminated menu. Mediterranean influenced with an emphasis on simple dressings and fresh produce, it’s hard to be disappointed, even if you let a 3 year-old randomly scribble on the glossy menu with a marker.

ANGEL FACE, 3540 South East 119th Avenue.


If you find yourself waiting for a table at Navarre, pop next door for a tipple at one of Portland’s newer drinking holes, Angel Face. Their mixologists will be able to whip you up anything you please, and will do so in style and with a good story at hand. At first the pink and green walls may look like wallpaper, but closer inspection always draws coos of delight as people realize the entire detailed interior is painted by hand. 

COAVA COFFEE, 1300 South East Grand Avenue.


There are legions of legendry coffee haunts in this town (Stumptown, Heart, Barista, Extracto, Ristretto Roasters), but one of our favorite places to caffienate is is Coava. Sip some of the best brew the town has to offer while perched on an industrial carpenter’s bench in their renovated warehouse space—these guys are known for creating the Kone, a stainless-steel filter that can be used in conjunction with a Chemex for an ultra-strength brew. Plus, they only serve coffee: Requests for tea will be met with a firm hand pointing toward the exit.

THE MEADOW, 3731 North Mississippi Avenue.


This tiny store continues the theme of doing one thing and doing it very well. Well, three things: The walls are lined with an incredible array of salts, chocolate and bitters that come from the likes of Southern France, Tahiti and Australia. The signature store for America’s sultan of salt, Mark Bitterman, The Meadow is the perfect stop to pick up a small, quirky gift (and do some salt sampling while you’re there).

OPAL CREEK, 721 North West 9th Avenue #236.


If you’re in the mood to either swim or hike off some of the pork products you’ve scoffed in the past 48 hours, Portland is home to multitude adventures that are within an hour or two’s drive. While many head to the obvious locations—Sauvie Island, Multnomah Falls, the Washougal River—Opal Creek may provide you with a slightly different experience. Located in an ancient forest swarming with multicolored giant beetles, this picturesque location has everything you could want: turquoise waters, huge abandoned mining structures, first-come-first-served camping, and if you’re willing to take a short hike, there’s even a natural waterslide for you to zig-zag down.

VINTAGE THEATRES


After stuffing yourself silly, you might feel like reclining in a food coma instead of hiking up a mountain. If this is your vibe, Portland plays host to many old-fashioned movie theatres with some pretty spectacular neon signage. Some favorites include The Hollywood, The Laurelhurst and The Baghdad, but wherever you go you’ll be able to watch old and new films alike for just a few bucks (and have a beer at the same time!).

THE RICE NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ROCKS AND MINERALS, 26385 North West Groveland Dr at Hillsboro.


If you feel like you need to get away from the crowds, head out toward the coast on Highway 26 and peel off to The Rice Museum, which confusingly doesn’t contain one of the country’s largest collections of starchy carbs, but instead of gemstones and natural rock phenomena (including a particularly impressive display of brightly colored thunder eggs). Off the beaten path and nestled between tall evergreens, this is an obscure Portland-only experience that won’t be found in your guidebooks (or on the outskirts of any other vaguely normal town, for that matter).

THE ENCHANTED FOREST, 8462 Enchanted Way Sout East at Turner.


Stumbling through the dark caves and slime-covered walls of The Enchanted Forest rekindles your childlike sense of wonder. All of the animatronic puppets are still programmed with the voices they had in the 1960s and many of the displays are covered in more cobwebs than they are paint. Wandering around the exhibits—which involves a lot of caves, moss and humorous sound effects—is a fine way to giggle away the afternoon without the aid of alcoholic lubrication or altitude-induced madness.

 

All of our KEEP KENZO WEIRD addresses can be found in our Pinterest map

Find your urban oasis downtown at the Kyoto Gardens.

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This season, KENZO heads out to CaliforniaCarol and Humberto’s home state. We asked Joy Yoon - author of the book 'The best things to do in Los Angeles – 1001 ideas' (Universe / Rizzoli International) - to select some surprising and unexpected addresses in Los Angeles. Our ninth installment of the series is gardens, little known but yet amazing!


You don’t find much green among the concrete and metal of downtown L.A., and the views are cluttered with buildings. If you’re looking to escape the hustle and bustle, head to the third-floor terrace of the Double Tree Hotel, where the Kyoto Gardens, a half-acre garden filled with greenery and reminiscent of Japan, is a nice and calming surprise. Smell the flowers, enjoy the waterfalls, and soon everything else will fade away, with only the skyline there to remind you where you really are.


120 South Los Angeles Street in downtown los angeles 213-629-1200.

Beware "the watchful eyes of Argus" at the Los Angeles County Arboretum and Botanic Garden.

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This season, KENZO heads out to CaliforniaCarol and Humberto’s home state. We asked Joy Yoon - author of the book 'The best things to do in Los Angeles – 1001 ideas' (Universe / Rizzoli International) - to select some surprising and unexpected addresses in Los Angeles. Our ninth installment of the series is gardens, little known but yet amazing!


This 127-acre arboretum might be smaller than the Huntington Library’s Botanical Gardens, but that doesn’t mean you’ll find any less of an array of things to do and view. Opened in 1956 on land jointly purchased by California and Los Angeles around Lucky Baldwin’s original development site of the modern-day Arcadia, the arboretum is home to exotic towering trees, a turtle-filled lake, the Queen Anne House (an ornately decorated and reportedly haunted Victorian gem), a waterfall, a “house” made of interwined branches, and vegetation from all over the world.


301 North Baldwin Avenue à Arcadia 626-821-3222

Did you know? : According to Greek Mythology, the eyes on a peacick's tail come from Argus, Hera's watchful servant. With one hundred eyes that were always on alert, he was in charge of guarding Zeus' lover Io. In order to free Io, Zeus ordered Hermes to kill Argus. He put his eyes to sleep and then slew him with a rock. Hera took, Argus's eyes and placed them upon the peacock's feather in his memory.

Make like Tarzan in the Jungle Garden at the Huntington Library’s Botanical Gardens.

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This season, KENZO heads out to CaliforniaCarol and Humberto’s home state. We asked Joy Yoon - author of the book 'The best things to do in Los Angeles – 1001 ideas' (Universe / Rizzoli International) - to select some surprising and unexpected addresses in Los Angeles. Our ninth installment of the series is gardens, little known but yet amazing!

 

The high forest canopy alone signals the drastic change in the environment. As you walk among the understory filled with shrubs, bromeliads, ferns, and leaves so big they could double as umbrellas, you feel as if you should be wearing khakis and a pith helmet while cutting back the dense foliage with machete. If swinging from the vines seems tempting, just think of George of the Jungle to fight off the urge.

 

1151 Oxford Road in San Marino 626-405-2100

This season, KENZO heads out to California, Carol and Humberto’s home state. We asked Joy Yoon - author of the book 'The best things to do in Los Angeles – 1001 ideas' (Universe / Rizzoli International) - to select some surprising and unexpected addresses in Los Angeles. Our eighth installment of the series is architecture. Let's finish this tour in Hollywood at The Chemosphere!

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Credit goes to the American Architect John Lautner for this innovative California Modern house built in 1960. The Chemosphere, a single-story octagon-shaped living space, is perched atop of 30-ft concrete pole in the Hollywood Hills. Faced with a site on a 45-degree angled slope, Lautner came up with this space-aged solution to build on the unbuildable, creating what Encyclopedia Britannica once called “the most modern home built in the world.” To the untrained eye it looks like a spaceship landed here –which Lautner simply welded down and called home- but it remains to this day one of the most renowned Modernist buildings in America.


7776 Torreyson Drive in Los Angeles.

 

From the book 'The best things to do in Los Angeles – 1001 ideas', by Joy Yoon (Universe / Rizzoli International).

See our map on Pinterest!

This season, KENZO heads out to CaliforniaCarol and Humberto’s home state. We asked Joy Yoon - author of the book 'The best things to do in Los Angeles – 1001 ideas' (Universe / Rizzoli International) - to select some surprising and unexpected addresses in Los Angeles. Our eighth installment of the series is architecture. Now, off to the incredible Hollyhock House.

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Yes, a visit to this house is a must. Architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s work has been loved, admired, and studied the world over. And of the 500+ buildings he completed within his lifetime, the Hollyhock House is one of the earliest examples of his work. Built in 1923 for Aline Barnsdall, it was soon given to the city in 1927. Visitors can purchase tickets at the Municipal Art Gallery to tour the heritage home, now located within Barnsdall Park, of the man the American Institute of Architects refers to as “the greatest American architect of all time”.

 

From the book 'The best things to do in Los Angeles – 1001 ideas', by Joy Yoon (Universe / Rizzoli International).

See our map on Pinterest!

This season, KENZO heads out to California, Carol and Humberto’s home state. We asked Joy Yoon - author of the book 'The best things to do in Los Angeles – 1001 ideas' (Universe / Rizzoli International) - to select some surprising and unexpected addresses in Los Angeles. Our eighth installment of the series is architecture. Let's start this architectural journey with the Case Study House n°8 also known as the Eames House.

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From the late 1940s until the 1960s, Arts & Architecture Magazine (started by John Entenza, an important figure in the growths of Modernism in American architecture) sponsored experiments on American residential architecture. Entenza commissioned major architects during that period, such as Richard Neutra, Pierre Koenig, Eero Saarinen, and J.R. Davidson, among others, to design and build inexpensive and efficient model homes for all the soldiers returning from the end of World War II, helping to spark a housing boom. Of the twenty-five Case Study houses built, not all designs saw mass construction; number 8 was considered the most successful among them. In fact, it was so successful as a structural living space that Ray and Charles Eames moved in, making it their home and studio for the rest of their lives. Proof enough that this remarkable building –now a National Historic Landmark that has wooed many an architecture lover to L.A. just to see it- worked. Make an advance appointment through the Eames Foundation to set up a visit.

 

203 North Chautauqua Boulevard in Pacific Palisades. 310-459-9663
 

From the book 'The best things to do in Los Angeles – 1001 ideas', by Joy Yoon (Universe / Rizzoli International).

See our map on Pinterest!


This season, KENZO heads out to California, Carol and Humberto’s home state. We asked Joy Yoon - author of the book 'The best things to do in Los Angeles – 1001 ideas' (Universe / Rizzoli International) - to select some surprising and unexpected addresses in Los Angeles. Our seventh installment of the series is views. To wind up the tour, climb to the roof observatory of the Griffith Observatory for a nightime view to take your breath away. 

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Roof Observation Deck of the Griffith Observatory...


The observatory has been mentioned several times already in this book, but there’s a reason for it. It just fits so many criteria of what you want to find in this city –one of those perfect places. A perfect place to visit almost any time, you really haven’t seen L.A. till you’ve seen it from here at night. Open till 10 p.m. almost every night, not only does the Roof Observation Deck provide breathtaking view of the city with its twinkling lights, it’s also the perfect excuse to leave your jacket in the car and cuddle in close on those cold nights. And if you’re looking to impress someone with your knowledge of constellations, here are few basics: the Big Dipper, due North, is most visible during the spring, and Polaris is the North Star. In autumn look for fours star that form a square, the top left star is part of Andromeda and the other three are part of Pegasus.

 

2800 East Observatory Avenue, Los Angeles.  Entry gates into Griffith Park close at 10 p.m. so enter anytime beforehand if you’re planning a night under the stars. 213-473-0800 www.griffithobs.org
 

 
From the book 'The best things to do in Los Angeles – 1001 ideas', by Joy Yoon (Universe / Rizzoli International).

 

See our map on Pinterest!

This season, KENZO heads out to California, Carol and Humberto’s home state. We asked Joy Yoon - author of the book 'The best things to do in Los Angeles – 1001 ideas' (Universe / Rizzoli International) - to select some surprising and unexpected addresses in Los Angeles. Our seventh installment of the series is views. From Mulholland Drive, take Mulholland highway down to the Pacific Coast Highway for a breath of fresh air. 

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Stop alongside the Pacific Coast Highway for a breath of fresh air and a salt-tinged kiss or two...


The beach at night is my favorite place. Long gone are the sun-tanning crowds that line the shore on a hot summer’s day. Long gone is all their chatter. After the sun has dipped its golden head below the ocean’s dark horizon, the beach lies deserted, and ready for you and you alone. There you’ll stand and feel as if you’re the only person in the world as you stare out into black, as the waves wash away all the tensions of city life and leave you at peace. And if the solitude of the beach at night becomes too much, then come back when moon is full with someone you love.

 

From the book 'The best things to do in Los Angeles – 1001 ideas', by Joy Yoon (Universe / Rizzoli International).

 

See our map on Pinterest!