TIGER GODS #1: DURGA - Kenzine, the Kenzo official blog

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Our brand new golden and shiny Tiger sweat-shirt just hit the e-shop!

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Discover also our brand new silver Eye sweat-shirt and the sparkling Eiffel Tower sweat-shirt and get ready for Christmas!

Last spread of this Flying Tigers story in Iceland by Laetitia Hotte!

You can still find the collection here.

Last season our collection brought you into the midst of the asian jungle, touring the animal rulers and human explorers within. This season we're exploring the skies, the asian gods, and their earthly temples, including clouds in the day and night, cloud-hopping tigers, and aerodynamic pilots. This month on the KENZO blog we'll take you to meet some of our favorite tiger- and tiger-riding- gods and goddesses and the cultures they've influenced.


 

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When it comes to tigers of legend, the gorgeous white tiger is perhaps the most revered. And it's easy to see why: the white tiger is easily one of the most awe-inducing animals, so deeply linked to the mystical it's almost like seeing a phoenix or a dragon in real life. During the Chinese Han Dynasty, when the tiger was believed to be the king of the animal kingdom (not the lion), it was thought that tigers would only turn white when they turned 500 years old.


Its white color aligned it with the element metal in and the power of the western direction, in the Chinese Five Elements. Because of this, the white tiger is seen as the guardian of the west and plays a large part in fengshui, playing its influence on the west side of houses and temples for protection. Tigers, and white tigers especially, are seen as powerful protectors, and white jade, which is known as "tiger jade", has long been used to protect soldiers and armies, and is often buried with the dead in order to protect them from demons in their graves. In traditional Korean beliefs it is said that the appearance of a white tiger has great influence over people who witness it, turning greedy people generous and selfish people humble.

An other composition by Laetitia Hotte for this story shot in Iceland where Flying Tigers are climbing rocks to the sky.

 

Last season, our collection brought you into the midst of the asian jungle, touring the animal rulers and human explorers within. This season we're exploring the skies, the asian gods, and their earthly temples, including clouds in the day and night, cloud-hopping tigers, and aerodynamic pilots. This month on the KENZO blog we'll take you to meet some of our favorite tiger- and tiger-riding- gods and goddesses and the cultures they've influenced.

 

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The shachihoko is a legendary Japanese animal with the head of a tiger and the body of a fish. It is famous for it's power over the rain, calling it at will. Because of this it was used on many traditional Japanese castles and temples, which were mostly made of wood. The shachihoko were adorned on either end of the main roof pole on the highest point of the roof, with the beam going into the shachihoko's mouth, and the fish tail going high into the air. This position was believed to allow it to call rain in case of a fire in the mostly wooden buildings, that would otherwise be defenseless. Japanese temples also often have tiger statues at their gates, with their backs to the temple and their faces treating visitors and scaring away evil.

This week, we wanted to highlight the Tiger bomber jacket, inspired by pilot wear.

 

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Last season our collection brought you into the midst of the asian jungle, touring the animal rulers and human explorers within. This season we're exploring the skies, the asian gods, and their earthly temples, including clouds in the day and night, cloud-hopping tigers, and aerodynamic pilots. This month on the KENZO blog we'll take you to meet some of our favorite tiger- and tiger-riding- gods and goddesses and the cultures they've influenced.

 

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Like in China, in Korea the tiger is traditionally seen as the divine spirit that guards the West. Stone tiger statues were also used to protect royal tombs from evil spirits in ancient Korea. The tiger is seen as a creature of great courage and insurmountable power, famously untamable. In one legend, a tiger and a bear came to Dangun, the mythical creator of the first Korean kingdom, wishing to become human beings. The bear was able to become a woman by meditating on Dangun's teachings in a cave for 100 days, but not even the tiger himself could keep his power at bay for that long, and he ran off into the mountains over which he still continues to rule.

Tigers flew to Iceland!
A land  of magic and ancient myths and gods where nature is wild, undomitable, almost feline. Here, bodies melt with the elements in order to create a new harmony, a new shape in the surrounding space.

This Flying Tigers scarf is available here.

 

style : Hulda Halldóra

makeup: Frida Maria using MAC

hair: Frida Maria using Label.m

Last season our collection brought you into the midst of the asian jungle, touring the animal rulers and human explorers within. This season we're exploring the skies, the asian gods, and their earthly temples, including clouds in the day and night, cloud-hopping tigers, and aerodynamic pilots. This month on the KENZO blog we'll take you to meet some of our favorite tiger- and tiger-riding- gods and goddesses and the cultures they've influenced.
 

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The tiger is one of the most important and most common symbols in traditional Chinese art and religion. One of the most popular gods in China, the Taoist God of Wealth, Tsai Shen Yeh, is often seen riding a tiger, similarly to the Hindu Goddess Durga, harnessing the tiger's strength to help it protect his followers wealth and lives. The tiger is believed to be the king of the animals and the mountains (sorry lions), and because of this tigers in traditional Chinese art are often drawn with three stripes on their forehead, depicting the character for king 王 . The tiger is a one of the four cardinal creatures, along with the Black Tortoise of the North, Green Dragon of the East, and Vermillion Bird of the South, representing the West, making an integral part of feng shui, playing his part in Chinese building designs. Tiger Gods are also one to be feared Taoist beliefs: in late winter when the animals are waking up from hibernation, paper tigers are set in front of temples and given food offerings to appease the ferocious Tiger God, hungry from his long sleep.

 

 

Last season our collection brought you into the midst of the asian jungle, touring the animal rulers and human explorers within. This season we're exploring the skies, the asian gods, and their earthly temples, including clouds in the day and night, cloud-hopping tigers, and aerodynamic pilots. This month on the KENZO blog we'll take you to meet some of our favorite tiger- and tiger-riding- gods and goddesses and the cultures they've influenced.

 

read more

The Hindu Goddess Durga is one of the most powerful Goddesses in Hinduism, being an incarnation of Devi, the female side of the divine. She is usually depicted as having either ten or eighteen arms, all holding weapons to protect herself and her followers from all directions. She's seen as the great protector, defending her worshippers from evil and dispelling their misery. As Hindu Gods and Goddesses are usually depicted with symbolic props, like vehicles and weapons, Durga also has her favored mode of transportation. Especially in Bengali depictions of her, her favored mode of transportation is, of course, the tiger. Her ability to ride a tiger demonstrates her mastery of all the tiger's best qualities, including power, will and determination, making her the most powerful protecting Goddesses in Hinduism.